December 2, 2008

Glogg Recipe, or "Let's Get Glogged"

snapsglogg.jpgLast weekend, we were introduced to Glogg (aka Gluvine, aka Gluwine, aka a heated cup o' heaven). When our hosts told us it was a Swedish mulled wine recipe we almost declined in favor of beer, because we've had some "mulled wine" in the past where it tasted like a cinnamon stick and a bottle of Mad Dog 20/20 had mated. We're glad we were feeling adventurous, though, because the Glogg we had was warm and fruity and had us full of holiday cheer in no time. Glogg is drank almost exclusively at Christmas in Sweden, and we can see why - if we had this stuff available all year 'round, we wouldn't get a thing done.

We don't have the exact recipe of the stuff we tried, but find the closest thing we could find online after the jump. If you're having a holiday party, it is a moral imperative that you make this for your guests. Because if you don't, they'll find out this stuff exists and that you didn't make it, and they'll never talk to you again.

Swedish Glogg

Ingredients:
1 pint water
1 handful raisins
1 handful almonds
1 cup prunes
3 sticks cinnamon
15 cardamom seeds
1 dessert spoon cloves
1 cup sugar
1 pint whiskey or apricot brandy
1 pint sweet wine (Port)
1 pint sour wine (Burgundy)

In a sauce pan, combine water, raisins, almonds, prunes, cinnamon sticks, cardamom seeds, cloves and sugar. Boil slowly for 15 to 20 minutes. Remove from heat. Then, add whiskey or apricot brandy, sweet wine (Port) and sour wine (Burgundy). Heat again after adding the liquor. Burn for 1 to 2 seconds, enough to burn the fumes off.

Our host said he didn't bother with multiple types of wine - just get a big old jug of something cheapish. You can also replace the prunes with apricots, use the apricot brandy instead of whiskey to give it a slightly less "Grandma's bowel mover" feel. We also avoided the almonds, because chewing your drink gets in the way of the buzz. Also, don't feel like you have to do the flambe step of burning it but c'mon...how cool is it when your wine is so fortified you have to light it on fire to make it drinkable?

Recipe via...wait, what? Well, apparently we found it at Oprah.com. What won't that woman conquer next?

Image via Sweden.se

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Posted by Jake Jamieson at December 2, 2008 7:11 AM
Recent Comments

I make this about once a year. It's awesome and your recipe is pretty close to what I use. I generally switch out the whisky for applejack or calvados, and the prunes for dried cranberries though.


Posted by: tatsu at December 11, 2008 7:53 PM

Here's an alternative recipe from a very glogg happy Swede.

Yoki's Glogg ala Fantask:

* 300 ml Vodka (cheap stuff is fine - great to finally have a use for Smirnoff)
* 200 ml Red Port (again nothing too fancy)
* 1.75 liter Red Wine (a large bottle of Cabernet is perfect)
* 2-3 sticks of Cinnamon
* 1 tsp Cardamom (preferably whole, but it's hard to find in the US)
* 1 tbsp Whole Cloves
* 2 tbsp Ground Orange Peel
* Raisins and Almonds

Put half the vodka and the cinnamon sticks, cloves, ground orange peel, cardamom and port in a jar with a tight fitting lid. Put the rest of the vodka and the raisins in another jar. Let everything sit at least overnight, but the longer the better. I've had it sit for about 2 weeks, and it only gets better!

Filter the first mix. Put a cheesecloth over the opening of the jar, as you pour the contents into a cooking pot, you want to sift out all the spices. Then add the vodka soaked raisins, along with any vodka that they haven't soaked up yet. Finally add the red wine and the almonds.

Then heat up the glogg to a nice warm serving temperature. Be sure not to overheat the glogg or you will lose all the alcohol. Alcohol evaporates at a mere 72 degrees Celsius, so if your glogg starts boiling (which happens at 100 degrees Celsius, you've already lost the alcohol). Immediately lower the heat or remove the pot from the stove at the first sign of any vapor escaping the mix and check if it's at serving temperature.

That's it! Serve it with a ladle, be sure to scoop up some almonds and raisins as well, and pour it into small glogg cups. Check at IKEA for real glogg cups, or use small coffee cups. Make sure that everyone gets some raisins and almonds in the bottom of their cups, but be aware that those raisins can be very potent.

Serve it with some gingerbread cookies, and if you want to go all out, have some stilton or blue cheese with the cookies.

Hints and tips:

If you can't get whole spices, just ground ones, don't worry about it. Just make sure to sift the mixture extra well before heating it. When I lived in the US, I only ever used ground cardamom.

If you think the glogg is too strong (only in America - sigh!), and if you followed the recipe above it shouldn't be, simply add more wine.

Normally I go crazy with the raisins. I usually fill a half liter jar with raisins and soak them to the brim in vodka. I also keep a watchful eye on the raisins, and am sure to add more vodka if they've soaked it all up. By the time I'm done with them they start looking like grapes again, although they numb your tongue when you bite into them. Personally I the stronger the Glogg ala Fantask is, the better it tastes. I also prefer slightly more port and less wine, but you should try it a few times to find what you like the best.

Of course you can always spike your glogg with some brandy or rum when serving it.

Now you're in business.


Posted by: Yoki at December 2, 2008 5:04 PM
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